Alice Cooper: 7/6/2003

This is one of my favorite ticket stubs. I mean, Alice Cooper, in Liverpool England, the home of the Beatles. How cool is that?

I was in England visiting family at this time, which was a very difficult period in my life. I was working like crazy because I owned a small business, and let’s say that my business partner was the antithesis of helpful. My wife and I were struggling financially, I was physically and mentally exhausted, and things were pretty grim. But there was a huge family gathering happening in England and one of my uncles offered to buy me a ticket to fly there, so I packed my bags and flew across the pond.

I was staying with family not far from Liverpool, and discovered much to my surprise that Alice was playing there. My cousin P., who is one of the most awesome people in the world, knew how much I liked Alice Cooper and bought two tickets so that I could go with one of my uncles. So my Uncle B. and  I headed down to Kings Dock to see the Coop.

The venue was surreal. It was like a big tent set up on the dock, so it had that crazy carnival feel, which is apropos for a Cooper concert.

The lights went down, and the band took the stage, opening with “Hello Hooray,” arguably the best opening song ever. And then it was all classic Cooper.

He broke out some really cool tunes that were surprising, like “Desperado,” “Public Animal #9,” and “Long Way to Go,” a highly underrated song off the “Love It To Death” album. The tour was dubbed the “Bare Bones Tour,” so it was missing the elaborate stage props (no guillotine or snake), just Alice and the band playing a solid set of killer tunes.

Although I was teetering on the brink of depression, seeing Alice in England was a nice boost for me. And getting to go to a concert with my uncle is a memory that I will treasure for the rest of my days. Anyway, here’s the setlist. Rock on!

Setlist

  • Hello Hooray
  • No More Mr. Nice Guy
  • Billion Dollar Babies
  • Long Way to Go
  • Public Animal #9
  • Be My Lover
  • Lost in America
  • I’m Eighteen
  • Serious
  • Desperado
  • Halo of Flies
  • Welcome to My Nightmare
  • Cold Ethyl
  • Only Women Bleed
  • Ballad of Dwight Fry
  • Guilty
  • School’s Out

Encore:

  • Poison
  • Elected
  • Disgraceland
  • Under My Wheels

RatDog: 10/13/1996

After Jerry Garcia’s death on August 9, 1995, Bob Weir’s solo project RatDog, which featured Rob Wasserman on bass, became one of the regular bands for lost Deadheads to flock to. I think this might have been my first RatDog show, since I don’t recall seeing them while Jerry was still alive, but if I discover an older stub, I will certainly amend this post.

The show was originally booked at The Edge, a club in Fort Lauderdale, FL. But the venue was changed to the Sunrise Musical Theatre, presumably because tickets were in such high demand that they needed a larger location.

According to the RadDog website, a band called Low and Sweet Orchestra opened, but I have no recollection of them. In fact, I don’t remember much about this show, although I have an impression of seeing Bobby performing “Bomb’s Away” and “Blackbird” at the Sunrise. This is a common problem when you have seen as many Dead-type shows as I have. They all tend to blend together after a while, and subtle distinctions are lost.

Anyway, here’s the setlist, courtesy of the RadDog site. Rock on!

Setlist:

  • Bombs Away >
  • Salt Lake City
  • City Girls >
  • Eternity
  • Blackbird
  • Desolation Row
  • Tanqueray
  • I Know You Rider
  • Little Red Rooster
  • Minglewood Blues
  • The Winners
  • Cassidy >
  • Bass/Drums >
  • Throwing Stones

Encore:

  • Johnny B. Goode

Ringo Starr and his All-Starr Band: 3/27/1999

This was my second time seeing Ringo.  The first time was cool, but this show was light years better.

The lineup for this incarnation of the All-Starr Band was nothing short of mind-blowing.

  • Ringo Starr – drums, vocals
  • Todd Rundgren (from Nazz and Utopia) – guitar, percussion, vocals
  • Gary Brooker (from Procol Harum) – organ, keyboards, vocals
  • Jack Bruce (from Cream) – bass, keyboards, vocals
  • Simon Kirke (from Free and Bad Company) – drums, vocals
  • Timmy Cappello – saxophone, keyboards, harmonica, guitar, vocals

The band opened the show with “It Don’t Come Easy,” which is maybe my favorite Ringo solo song and one that he did not play the first time I saw him. This show also had a nice amount of Beatles tunes woven in. And the songs from the other members—WOW! Todd actually played some Utopia, Simon sang some Bad Co. and a Free song, Gary Brooker sang some classic Procol Harum stuff, including Conquistador, and Jack Bruce belted out several Cream hits. There was absolutely no weak spots anywhere in this show.

Here’s the full setlist. Rock on!

Setlist:

  • It Don’t Come Easy
  • Act Naturally
  • Whisky Train
  • I Saw the Light
  • Sunshine of Your Love
  • Shooting Star
  • Boys
  • Love Me Do
  • Yellow Submarine
  • Conquistador
  • Hammer in My Heart
  • I’m the Greatest
  • No No Song
  • I Feel Free
  • All Right Now
  • I Wanna Be Your Man
  • Bang the Drum All Day
  • White Room
  • A Whiter Shade of Pale
  • Photograph

Encore:

  • You’re Sixteen
  • With a Little Help From My Friends

Warren Haynes 21st Christmas Jam: 12/12/2009

Another year, and another Christmas Jam. This one was special for me because my wife and I took our older daughter, along with some of her friends. This was the only Christmas Jam that she attended with us, and I have great memories of how excited she and her friends were.

The lineup for this show was a little more eclectic than most jams. The main acts included:

  • Counting Crows
  • Ani DiFranco
  • Gov’t Mule
  • moe.
  • George Porter Jr.
  • Eric Krasno
  • Nigel Hall & Adam Deitch
  • Stax Records Legend William Bell

In addition, there was a nice group of guest musicians who augmented the headliners.

Special Guests:

  • Aerosmith’s Brad Whitford
  • Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews
  • Jeff Austin
  • Mike Barnes
  • DJ Logic
  • Jackie Greene
  • Col. Bruce Hampton
  • Jimmy Herring of Widespread Panic
  • Kevn Kinney
  • Collective Soul’s Ed Roland

Counting Crows was definitely cool. They did a cover of The Beatles’ “Golden Slumbers” medley, which was excellent. I also enjoyed Ani DiFranco. She is someone that I probably never would have paid to see by herself, but she was better than I expected. Glad to be able to check her off the list. William Bell was also really great. I wasn’t familiar with him, but was very impressed with his performance.

At one point, I took all the youngsters down onto the floor for a bit, while my wife held the seats. While on the floor, Brad Whitford joined some musicians on stage and did a cool version of “Last Child,” one of my fav songs from Aerosmith’s “Rocks” album. As we were cramped into the floor space, I noticed some older freak offering his pipe to one of the younger girls I was chaperoning. I caught his eye and gave him a look that basically said, “You’ll most regret doing that.” He heeded the silent warning and melted back into the sea of people.

As always, the show went on until the wee hours of the morning. I was not able to find all the setlists, but I found a few. Here are the ones I was able to locate. Rock on!

Setlists:

Ani DiFranco:

  • Anticipate
  • Untouchable Face
  • Manhole
  • As Is
  • Present/Infant
  • Fuel (with Nigel Hall)
  • ¿Which Side Are You On? (with Warren Haynes & Jeff Austin)
  • Overlap (with Adam Deitch, George Porter Jr., Jeff Austin, Nigel Hall, Warren Haynes, Eric Krasno & Xmas Jam)

Counting Crows:

  • Round Here
  • Golden Slumbers / Carry That Weight / The End
  • Miami
  • Goodnight L.A.
  • 1492
  • Washington Square
  • A Long December
  • Rain King (with Warren Haynes)
  • With a Little Help From My Friends (with Warren Haynes & Jeff Austin)
  • Rain King (with Warren Haynes) (reprise)
  • This Land Is Your Land (with Warren Haynes)

Ed Roland:

  • The World I Know
  • Shine

George Porter Jr.:

  • Little Old Money Maker
  • Leave Me Alone (w/ Trombone Shorty )
  • Fire on the Bayou (w/Jimmy Herring, and Xmas Jam Horn Section)
  • Hard to Handle (w/William Bell, Audley Freed & Xmas Jam Horn Section)
  • Everyday Will Be Like a Holiday (w/William Bell, Warren Haynes, and Audley Freed)
  • You Don’t Miss Your Water (w/William Bell, Audley Freed, and Xmas Jam Horn Section)
  • Everybody Loves a Winner (w/William Bell, Audley Freed, and Xmas Jam Horn Section)
  • Born Under a Bad Sign (w/William Bell, Brad Whitford, Audley Freed, Xmas Jam Horn Section, and Warren Haynes)

Gov’t Mule:

  • Broke Down on the Brazos
  • Steppin’ Lightly
  • Railroad Boy
  • Frozen Fear
  • Devil Likes It Slow (with Jimmy Herring and Ron Holloway)
  • Patchwork Quilt (with Jimmy Herring and Fred Eltringham)
  • Sugaree (with Jackie Greene, Jimmy Herring & Fred Eltringham)
  • Don’t Let Me Down (with Jackie Greene and Fred Eltringham)
  • I Feel Like Breaking Up Somebody’s Home (with Brad Whitford, Ron Holloway & Fred Eltringham)
  • Train Kept A-Rollin’ (with Brad Whitford and Fred Eltringham)
  • I Shall Be Released

Warren Haynes:

  • Wild Horses

moe.:

  • Captain America (with DJ Logic)
  • Tailspin
  • Together at Christmas
  • Z0Z (Zed Nought Z)
  • Happy Hour Hero (with Jimmy Herring)
  • George

Julian Lennon: 4/2/1985

Julian Lennon had a brief moment in the sun in the mid 1980’s. He had some videos on MTV, and of course, he had a somewhat famous dad. His music was pretty good, but a little on the poppy side for my personal tastes. That said, when he booked a couple of shows nearby, I decided go and check one out, figuring he would likely do a couple of his dad’s songs too.

I went with my girlfriend, and we had decent seats. The Sunrise was a nice small venue, so anywhere you sat was good, but we were fairly close to the stage on the side.

The show was pretty much what I had expected. He focused on his own material, but then tossed in a Beatles song as well as a couple other covers at the end that John would have approved of. In fact, John had also recorded a great cover version of “Stand By Me.”

While definitely not the greatest show I had seen, it was enjoyable and I am glad that I got to see him. Here’s the setlist.

Setlist:

  • Well I Don’t Know
  • O.K. for You
  • On the Phone
  • Lonely
  • Say You’re Wrong
  • Let Me Be
  • Valotte
  • Jesse
  • Space
  • Big Mama
  • Too Late for Goodbyes
  • Stand by Me
  • Day Tripper
  • Slippin’ and Slidin’

Ringo Starr and his All-Starr Band: 6/2/1992

This was my first time seeing Ringo. What can I say—he’s a Beatle and therefore resides in the hall of rock and roll royalty.

He performed at the Sunrise Musical Theatre, a small venue that had good acoustics, and we had fourth-row seats, which was especially nice. I went with my wife, who is a huge Todd Rundgren fan, so she was especially excited that Todd was a part of Ringo’s band. His band truly was an all-star lineup:

  • Ringo Starr – drums, percussion, cowbell, vocals
  • Joe Walsh – guitar, keyboards, talk box, bass drum, vocals
  • Nils Lofgren – guitar, vocals
  • Todd Rundgren – guitar, keyboards, drums, percussion, tambourine, vocals
  • Dave Edmunds – guitar, vocals
  • Burton Cummings – keyboards, guitar, tambourine, harmonica, flute, vocals
  • Timothy B. Schmit – bass, guitar, vocals
  • Zak Starkey – drums
  • Timmy Cappello – saxophone, percussion, keyboards, vocals

What was really cool about this show was that Ringo allowed all the other members of his band to perform a couple of their songs, so the set was very egalitarian. Todd singing “Bang the Drum All Day” and Dave Edmunds singing “I Hear You Knocking” particularly stood out for me.

What was really bizarre, though, was Burton Cummings. I’d seen him with the Guess Who, and he was cool. He sang and performed well at this show, but he was doing some strange things on stage. He kept licking the microphone stand, like he was performing fellatio or something, then stroking it furiously in masturbatory fashion. Not that I was offended—all’s fair in rock and roll as far as I’m concerned—it just seemed out of place with the rest of the band and what they were doing.

As far as Ringo’s songs, he sang a nice mix of Beatles’ tunes and solo material. The only song that was noticeably absent was “It Don’t Come Easy.” That was one song I pretty much expected to hear, but didn’t. Still, it was a great show, and I would see Ringo perform “It Don’t Come Easy” the next time I saw him.

Here’s the full setlist.

Setlist:

  • I’m the Greatest
  • No No Song
  • No Time
  • Girls Talk
  • Look at Us Now
  • I Can’t Tell You Why
  • Shine Silently
  • Bang the Drum All Day
  • Don’t Go Where the Road Don’t Go
  • Yellow Submarine
  • Pretty Maids All in a Row
  • Love of the Common Man
  • Keep On Tryin’
  • Wiggle
  • Black Maria
  • In the City
  • You’re Sixteen
  • Weight of the World
  • Walkin’ Nerve
  • I Hear You Knocking
  • American Woman
  • Photograph

Encore:

  • Act Naturally
  • With a Little Help From My Friends

Pat Benatar: 9/25/1981

Back in 1981, Pat Benatar was definitely one of the top women of rock. Not only did her songs rock, but they were really empowering for young women, which was a great thing in my opinion.

I don’t recall with whom I went to this concert, but I do have a clear memory of her on stage. The first thing that struck me was that she was quite short. For some reason, she seemed taller in the MTV videos. But regardless of stature, she was pure energy on stage. I recall being amazed at the level of power which she projected.

I wish I had more to share about this show. I looked at a few setlists from that tour, and this was pretty much the standard one. As I read it, I recalled “Helter Skelter,” which I had forgotten. It’s great when memories are rekindled.

Rock on!

Setlist (generic from tour):

  • You Better Run
  • Treat Me Right
  • Fire and Ice
  • Out-A-Touch
  • I Need a Lover
  • Promises in the Dark
  • Hit Me With Your Best Shot
  • Hell Is for Children
  • Heartbreaker
  • Precious Time
  • In the Heat of the Night
  • We Live for Love
  • Helter Skelter
  • Just Like Me
  • I’m Gonna Follow You
  • It’s a Tuff Life