Perry Farrell’s Satellite Party: 9/10/2007

So I appreciate a good freak show as much as the next person, which is why I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to see Perry Farrell’s Satellite Party in a club setting, especially since it was only $18. I had seen Jane’s Addiction, but had never seen Porno for Pyros. I figured this would be some short-lived side project, so I had better not miss it. I got tickets for my wife and I, since she also likes Farrell and had not seen him in any of his musical incarnations.

Not surprising, the place was packed with freaks, so we blended in easily enough. Couldn’t tell you anything about the opening act. They were obviously forgettable.

When Farrell came on stage and opened the show with “Stop!” the place went bonkers. Everyone was dancing and having a blast. The set was short, but high quality, including classics from Jane’s Addiction and Porno for Pyros, as well as new material. Normally, I’d feel a little rooked by a short set, but not this night. I was happy with the songs they played, the price was cheap, and I was home at a reasonable time.

Here’s the full setlist.

Setlist:

  • Stop!
  • Kinky
  • Insanity Rains
  • Mountain Song
  • Hard Life Easy
  • Been Caught Stealing
  • Only Love, Let’s Celebrate
  • Wish Upon a Dog Star
  • Pets
  • Ultra Payloaded Satellite Party
  • Jane Says

The Struts: 10/10/2018

When I first heard The Struts, I was on the fence, leaning toward “meh.” But friends of mine who are big music fans insisted that they are great in concert and that I should definitely see them. So when I heard they were coming to town, and the ticket prices were reasonable ($20, cheaper than parking at some shows), I figured I would go and check them out. So I grabbed tickets for my wife and I.

The concert was mid-week, so we had to go over there after work and dinner, which meant we would be a little late getting there. But thankfully, my friend Bill, who is a music writer and has a great blog, had interviewed the band before the show and secured seats for us.

There were two opening acts, and we got there in time to catch the second one, White Reaper. They were OK as far as openers go. After a short break, The Struts took the stage.

They were over-the-top glam. My wife commented that the singer was like a cross between Freddie Mercury and Lady Gaga. I can see that. He was definitely flamboyant. Musically, the band was tight, and they had the crowd rockin’ from beginning to end. I thoroughly enjoyed myself. And while I still feel that their songwriting could be honed a little, their energy on stage makes up for it with juice to spare.

Here’s a couple pictures I took from the show, as well as the setlist.

Setlist:

  • Primadonna Like Me
  • Body Talks
  • Kiss This
  • Fire (Part 1)
  • Dirty Sexy Money
  • People
  • One Night Only
  • Dancing in the Dark
  • Mary Go Round
  • Put Your Money on Me
  • Bulletproof Baby
  • Where Did She Go

Encore:

  • Somebody New
  • Ashes (Part 2)
  • Could Have Been Me

Blue Oyster Cult: 7/3/1991

Blue Oyster Cult, in a club. Definitely had to check this one out. Although they were not the band I saw back in the late 70’s, they still had Buck Dharma and Eric Bloom, so well worth the $10.

I went with my friend Jim and we wedged our way into Summers on the Beach, a Fort Lauderdale club that managed to get bands that brought in more fans than was probably safe to host.

The band came out, and as expected, they rocked the house. Seeing them in a small venue was way different than seeing them in a stadium. And although the rockers were starting to show their age, they still kicked out the jams.

One cool thing that happened, during a pause between songs, I screamed out for “Astronomy,” which is my fav BOC tune. Eric stepped up to the mic and said, “Yeah, we can do that one,” and broke into it. Although looking back over the setlists from that tour, seems like “Astronomy” was a standard, it was still cool and made me feel like there was a connection between me and the band.

Here is a generic setlist from the tour, which seems like what they played at this gig.

  • Stairway to the Stars
  • OD’d On Life Itself
  • Before The Kiss
  • ETI
  • Buck’s Boogie
  • Take Me Away
  • Cities On Flame
  • Astronomy
  • Career of Evil
  • Unknown Tongue
  • Burnin’ For You
  • Godzilla
  • (Don’t Fear) The Reaper
  • Dominance & Submission
  • The Red & The Black

Edie Brickell and the New Bohemians: 3/23/1991

Edie Brickell was one of those artists that I liked right off the bat. She had that cool hippie chic vibe, and her guitarist was obviously influenced by Jerry Garcia. So I jumped at the opportunity to see her and her band at the Button South, which was one of the better music clubs in South Florida at the time.

There is not much to say about this show, other than it was really, really good. Edie’s vocals were so sweet, and the band was tight and energetic. They also tossed in some cool cover tunes by Bob Dylan and David Bowie. I guess if you are going to pick artists to cover, those are solid choices.

Which I had more to share, but it was just a good, fun concert, and I was glad that I got to see them in their prime.

Here’s the setlist.

Setlist:

  • Woyaho
  • Mama Help Me
  • Little Miss S.
  • Nothing
  • Carmelito
  • Strings of Love
  • Picture Perfect Morning
  • Do It Again
  • He Said
  • Jackrabbit
  • Stwisted
  • Oak Cliff Bra
  • Air of December
  • What I Am
  • A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall
  • Forgiven
  • This Eye
  • Circle
  • Moonage Daydream

King Crimson: 2/28/2003

For me, King Crimson sort of holds a mythical place in the world of rock music. They were definitely at the forefront of the prog movement, so when I saw they were coming to town, and playing a very small venue, I didn’t hesitate to grab tickets. My brother also wanted to go, so I grabbed a ticket for him and made plans for him to come to town for the concert.

This show was part of the Power To Believe tour. The album and tour featured some incredible musicians:

  • Robert Fripp – guitar, mastering, production
  • Adrian Belew – guitar, vocals, lyrics
  • Pat Mastelotto – electronic drumming, hybrid acoustic
  • Trey Gunn – Warr guitar

I had seen Adrian Belew perform with David Bowie, and he was amazing, so I was looking forward to seeing him again. And as a guitarist, I was really psyched to see the legendary Robert Fripp.

The concert was somewhat short, but the quality of the music made up for that. Technically, they were as impressive as I expected them to be. Fripp was a little strange, and occasionally would walk off stage for reasons unknown, but he always returned and stoically ripped through his scales.

The only thing that was a little disappointing for me was that the song choice was limited to three albums:   The Power to Believe, The ConstruKction of Light, and THRAK. I really thought they would do at least one song from Discipline, and I would have loved to see them play “21st Century Schizoid Man,” but alas—Fripp plays what Fripp wants to play. Anyway, it was still a killer show. Here’s the setlist.

Setlist:

  • The ConstruKction of Light
  • ProzaKc Blues
  • The Power to Believe I: A Cappella
  • Level Five
  • Eyes Wide Open
  • EleKtriK
  • Happy With What You Have to Be Happy With
  • The Power to Believe II: Power Circle
  • Facts of Life
  • The World’s My Oyster Soup Kitchen Floor Wax Museum
  • Dangerous Curves
  • Larks’ Tongues in Aspic (Part IV)

Encore:

  • The Power to Believe III: Deception of the Thrush
  • VROOOM
  • Dinosaur

Grateful Dead and New York City Percussion Ensemble: 9/16/1987

For the second night at Madison Square Garden, we had seats straight back in the lower level. When we got in and took our seats, I noticed something different about the stage—there were chairs set up along the front of the stage. My heart began to race! I immediately assumed that this meant the Dead were going to play an acoustic set. I had never seen the Dead play acoustic, but had heard recordings and was psyched at the prospect. Alas, they did not do an acoustic set, but we were treated to a nice surprise.

The New York City Percussion Ensemble opened the show, unannounced. They were awesome, and had some incredible African dancers accompanying the drummers. One of the people sitting near us said that Babatunde Olatunji was one of the percussionists. I have not been able to confirm this, but I am going with the belief that he was there and that I got to see the legendary drummer perform.

After the drummers, the Dead came out and played two solid sets, so it ended up being quite a long night of music. High points for me were Brent singing “Devil With a Blue Dress > Good Golly Miss Molly,” and a roaring version of “Truckin’” coming out of drums and space.

A side note about this show that is pretty amazing. There were a couple of guys sitting in front of us, and we chatted a bit between sets. Well, after the tour was over and we were all back in South Florida, my friends Julie and Miriam (same friends I was at these shows with) went with me to a Grateful Dead night at a club in Fort Lauderdale. While we were there, these two guys came up to us and said “Hey! Weren’t you at the Dead shows at Madison Square Garden, toward the back, on the second night?” They were the same dudes who were sitting in front of us! We exchanged phone numbers and became close friends. In fact, one of them, Armando, is still one of my closest friends today. It was kind of like some strange twist of fate.

Anyway, here is the full setlist from the show. “New York’s got the ways and means; but just won’t let you be, oh no.”

Set 1:

  • Touch of Grey
  • Scarlet Begonias
  • Little Red Rooster
  • Dire Wolf
  • My Brother Esau
  • High Time
  • Let it Grow
  • Don’t Ease Me In

Set 2:

  • Bertha
  • Greatest Story Ever Told
  • Devil With a Blue Dress
  • Good Golly Miss Molly
  • Devil With a Blue Dress
  • He’s Gone
  • Drums > Space
  • Truckin’
  • Wharf Rat
  • Throwin’ Stones
  • Not Fade Away

Encore:

  • Black Muddy River

Leftover Salmon and Snake Oil Medicine Show: 4/20/2004

I have only a vague recollection of this show. At the time, I had my own business, which required me to work an average of 60 to 70 hours per week, and I was in a constant state of exhaustion. But someone gave me a free ticket, and far be it from me to pass on free music, no matter how tired I am. So I went by myself to the show.

I had seen Leftover Salmon before at one of the H.O.R.D.E. Festivals, and I remember thinking it was better seeing them in a small venue. I had not seen Snake Oil Medicine Show, and what I remember about them, they were cool. But I was really beat. I ended up leaving early, not because of the music, but because I could barely stand on my feet.

It was not long afterwards that I closed my business.

Goblin: 10/3/2013

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the band Goblin (which I will assume most people are), I will provide a little background info. Goblin is an Italian prog rock band that has been around since the early 1970s. They are best known for their film soundtrack work, particularly Dario Argento’s horror films (including  “Suspiria,” “Tenebre,” and “Profondo Rosso”). They also composed and performed the soundtrack music for George Romero’s classic “Dawn of the Dead.” So as a horror film buff, I was familiar with the band, even though they remained under the US music radar. Additionally, they had never performed in the United States. So when I saw they were coming to my little city in the mountains, there was no question about going. I immediately got a ticket and convinced my friend Greg (a big prog rock fan) that he should do the same.

The show at the Orange Peel was the second stop on the tour, which opened in Atlanta. Greg and I got there early and were interested in seeing the opening act: Secret Chiefs 3. Greg had heard good things about this band from another musician friend of ours, so we felt compelled to check them out. Really glad we did. They sounded great and were the perfect opening act, wearing ritualistic hooded cloaks while performing intricate and darkly mystical music.

Afterwards, Goblin took the stage and launched into an intense performance of some of the most spine-tingling progressive music you can imagine. And if that was not enough, they had a big screen behind the band where they were showing very graphic scenes from the various horror films that featured their music in the soundtracks. And while the band performed “Zombi” as scenes from “Dawn of the Dead” were splattered across the screen, it reminded me of just how much the music added to the overall experience of watching that film for the first time.

After the concert, I went to the merchandise table and bought a blood-red vinyl record, which included some of their more well-known pieces and was only being sold on the tour. I figured it would be a great keepsake.

I’m not sure if the band will tour the States again. I did see on their website that they are playing the Psycho Festival in Las Vegas on August 18, 2018, but that is their only date worldwide. They did do a full tour in 2017, so it is possible they will tour again. If you are into prog rock and/or horror films, I highly recommend going to see them if you have a chance.

I could not find the Asheville setlist, but here is one from the same tour, so I assume it is the same.

Setlist:

  • Magic Thriller
  • Mad Puppet
  • Dr. Frankenstein
  • Roller
  • E Suono Rock
  • Aquaman
  • Non Ho Sonno
  • Death Farm
  • Goblin
  • L’Alba Dei Morti Viventi
  • Zombi
  • Tenebre
  • Suspiria
  • School at Night
  • Profundo Rosso
  • Zaratozom

They Might Be Giants: 9/28/2011

They Might Be Giants is the ultimate nerd band. I first heard them on a college radio station and initially did not know what to make of their music. But I soon became a fan, and their album “Flood” dominated my CD player for a long time in the 90’s. So when my daughter expressed a desire to go see them, I went out and got us tickets, figuring it would be a fun father/daughter night out.

We got to the Orange Peel and found a spot amid the other music geeks. The band opened with “Asheville,” a song they wrote about the city we were in, which was very cool. They continued playing a great show full of quirky songs that made my geek-heart flutter. “Particle Man” and “Istanbul (Not Constantinople)” were particularly fun for me. The crowd was psyched, jumping up and down in rhythm to the music. It was just a fun, fun night.

I can’t express just how much time like this mean to me. Live music is such a bonding experience, and sharing this night with my daughter is a memory that I will treasure. If you haven’t listened to this band, I suggest checking them out. They are unique and not like any “popular” music you will have heard before. Here is the setlist from the show.

Setlist:

  • Asheville
  • Can’t Keep Johnny Down
  • We Live in a Dump
  • Canajoharie
  • Judy Is Your Viet Nam
  • Particle Man
  • Meet James Ensor
  • Los Angeles
  • Turn Around
  • Celebration
  • Birdhouse in Your Soul
  • Clap Your Hands
  • Withered Hope
  • Battle for the Planet of the Apes
  • Cloisonné
  • Spoiler Alert
  • lder
  • Don’t Let’s Start
  • Your Racist Friend
  • Alphabet of Nations
  • Old Pine Box
  • Ana Ng
  • When Will You Die
  • The Mesopotamians

Encore:

  • Careful What You Pack
  • Istanbul (Not Constantinople)

Encore 2:

  • Lie Still, Little Bottle
  • Nothing’s Gonna Change My Clothes

Donavon Frankenreiter: 11/23/2010

So I knew absolutely nothing about this dude when I bought tickets for this show. In fact, the only reason I bought tickets was our friend Erin was visiting from Miami and my wife and I wanted to take her to a show at the Orange Peel (Asheville’s coolest music venue). This was the only show happening while she was visiting, so we went by default. We were pleasantly surprised.

First off, the artist was giving away free copies of his latest CD to all attendees, which I thought was very cool. Additionally, attendees were given fake moustaches to wear, since Donavon I guess is known for his stache. We all donned our upper-lip wigs and found a spot.

While I did not know any of the songs he played, he sounded good and he was a lot of fun on stage. We all enjoyed ourselves, which is a testament to his performance. We all left the show in a great mood, and I was really happy that our friend got to experience the Asheville music scene.

Not much else to share about this one. Keep on enjoying live music!